• PhotoRadarScam Posted: 10/2/2009 1:38pm PDT

    The survey is bogus. The camera companies always use the same companies and always get similar results. The survey achieves the results that were paid for. Case in point:
    In August, Redflex did a survey in Louisiana and boasted 72% support for the cameras: http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20090827005118&newsLang=en
    However, in Sulphur, LA this year, 85% voted at a REAL poll to reject photo enforcement: http://www.thenewspaper.com/news/27/2738.asp
    Wow, 72% support turns into an 85% rejection? I think I know which poll I want to believe. Nice try.

  • john_v avatar John Posted: 10/2/2009 3:09pm PDT

    I believe it of NYC residents. Remember, roughly half the 8 million residents of the 5 boroughs don't own cars. And people outnumber cars in NYC by, oh, probably 20 to 1 or so. It's just that cars take up an inordinate amount of space, even in the areas where there's good public transit. NYC is not America.

  • Allan Posted: 10/2/2009 3:28pm PDT

    This is by the same firm that strategizes and spins all the time for right-wingers, yet here they're advocating for more regulation. Skewing data for hire is a hard life...

  • Banphotoradar Posted: 10/2/2009 9:47pm PDT

    Lol. Every city who has voted on photo radar got rid of it. These polls are paid for by the photo radar companies. What results do you think they will get? Redflex has used this same tactic in state after state.
    camerafraud.com

  • fb_1510606196 avatar Carl Posted: 10/4/2009 4:03pm PDT

    The surveying company Public Opinion Strategies (POS) was doing what they were paid to do by American Traffic Solutions (ATS). POS did more than that, to keep the survey honest. When the person interviewed was asked if they personally agreed that red light enforcement was a good thing, you would not expect that person to admit that they are against a “good thing”. That 77 % “yes” turns into a 39% “yes”, when the interviewed person is asked to attribute his real feelings onto “others”. In another survey the results were 69% yes for “me”; 53% yes for “them”.
    Survey companies (I worked for one about ten years) use this trick to get the person to reveal how they would vote in a closed-ballot election. This trick was exposed during the recent Democrat primary elections. In state with a caucus, the voters were required to publically state (voice or show of hands) which candidate they preferred.
    The “Everybody will think I’m a racist if I vote for Hillary” aspect of that led to the overwhelming majority for Obama in those states. Note that Hillary did win in the closed-ballot states.
    Slightly off-topic, this should convince honest people to junk the caucus primaries, and the open-to-anyone primaries, too. Cross-over voting complicated the above analysis.