• al bently Posted: 2/28/2010 12:46pm PST

    i have instructed my family members that drive the 2007 toyota prius that we have to hold the power button in for three solid seconds and everything will turn off.... if unintended acceleration occurs.
    two of my older sons asked "then what happens" do the wheels lock? can you steer? can you brake?-- any idea?

  • fyi Posted: 11/8/2009 6:45pm PST

    First and foremost, it’s tragically obvious there has not been nearly enough thought to all the necessary fail-safe and safety override modes designed into these “drive-by-wire” automotive systems. The Germans at least had the good sense to make their engines go to idle mode if their systems were presented with the conflicting inputs of throttle and brakes applied at the same time ("smart pedal"). (The Toyota system does not do this. Shame on Toyota — as well as the NHTSA who apparently “approved” of this!) As far as “keyless” ignition system designs go, an across-the-board “standard” is needed immediately. The dashboard “switch” should probably have at least three positions: “Off” (as in -- turn the engine ignition AND electric fuel pump systems both off -- right now); “Idle” (to bring engine power down - but not fully off - to allow for the power steering and brakes to continue to function); and “On or Run.” To have to “hold” the start-button in for ” three seconds” during an emergency situation is beyond any safety design rules I believe could or would ever be allowed for production and placed into widespread use by the driving public……

  • stenman Posted: 10/9/2009 10:11am PDT

    My 2007 Prius has L hooks under the driver seat that holds the floor mat in place. It is the only car in my 40 plus years of driving that has this feature. It is surprising that the Prius of all cars would be subject to a recall due this "problem". My Mercedes CLK has factory original floor mats that are too thin and slide under the pedals and crumple up as well, but I have gotten in the habit of leaning down and pulling them out of the way periodically. Toyota's response seems excessive, especially when compared to the lack of response by Ford to their problems with the Pinto, Explorer, and Crown Victoria, which have incinerated their occupants as a result of product defects known to the Ford Engineers for years.