• John Rees Posted: 5/15/2009 2:42pm PDT

    "VW credibility"

    I question VW's credibility. View my VW experience at: http://reesphotos.com/VW/

  • Reece Posted: 5/17/2009 3:31pm PDT

    "the truth"

    Finaly someone has the balls to say the truth, electric cars are a good decade off being a real viable solution. The Volt etc are largely marketing exercises to be seen to be doing something, the last thing the car makers need is a load of people buying these things and sending them broke. Probnlems with diesels outsid eof Europe is the cost and the quality of the fuel but these can be overcome. Have Americans really changed? Hard to say, shocked out of their stupor probably but whether it is permanent or not will have to see.

  • John Voelcker Posted: 5/18/2009 4:39am PDT

    "Jacoby has a long history ..."

    ... of remarks denigrating electric-drive cars. IIRC, last year he said they wouldn't be practical for 30 years.
    Much of this is due to 10 years of European makers assuming that diesels would be their solution to tightening US mileage standards. But when gasoline got expensive last summer in the US, diesel got even *more* expensive since it's not granted the substantial tax breaks it is in Europe.
    That cost premium, plus US mainstream reluctance to embrace diesels--which suffer from bad legacy PR and an aversion to gassing up next to semis--meant that sales of new "clean diesels" didn't spike as the Euros hoped.
    Now they're anxious, and casting around for something to throw stones at.

  • Sarah Meyers Posted: 5/18/2009 7:45am PDT

    "?"

    I am skeptical about his comments because EVs have been around since the early 1920s. We know they can be produced at affordable rates - look at the upcoming Tesla economy vehicle that will available in 2 years and what about the unforgettable documentary, "Who killed the electric car?"

  • Kumar Posted: 5/30/2009 5:00am PDT

    "It's about the freedom to do stuff"

    Pure EVs will be a low seller for the same reasons SUVs were a huge hit. People loved the idea that they could go wherever, whenever they wanted to, even if they only went off-raod <1% of the time.
    With EVs, the drawbacks will be a limitation on range. People won't get them in mass because they want the possibility of that long road trip, even if they never take any.
    Sure, you could rent a car for that, but if that argument made sense to the buying public, people wouldn't have been clamoring for 7 and 9 passenger monsters that could tow a house.
    Don't get me wrong, EVs will be great as a commuter car, but mainly for city dwellers and as a 2nd car in two car households.